Options Trading Advisor

Selecting an Options Trading Advisor
Selecting an options trading advisor is an important step in preparing to trade options. Before we break down the different types of accounts, let’s talk with the beginners first. If you have experience investing in the stock market, you probably already know that you can trade options with you current account.

Selecting an Options Trading Advisor
For the beginner, this is a very important step. In fact, selecting an options trading advisor and creating a stock trading plan are the two most important things you can do prior to entering the market. The critical factors in selecting an options trading advisor are:

  • Know Yourself – Be honest in evaluating your tendencies; are you a risk taker? Do you like to study and do research? Do you enjoy the idea of investment risk? Do you realize that you have more dollars than sense? You know the answers to questions like these; it is important that you understand your tendencies because there are options trading advisors for every personality type.
  • Knowing The Available Advisors – Sounds difficult but once you have done a self-evaluation, you are well on your way to finding the right options trading advisor for you. Investment firms offer a number of different accounts types based on the needs you have.
  • What Are The Different Types of Accounts?
  • Trading accounts vary based of level of service, cost and available resources. The list below will give you an idea of the different types of accounts available:
  • Discount Trade – This type of account is intended for the experienced trader; you will not have the security of an options trading advisor. Because you will be calling your directly to the order desk or the floor, you will receive nearly instantaneous placing of orders. The commissions for discount trades are low but little is available as far as research or recommendations from an options trading advisor.
  • Internet Trade – Is it important to you to talk with an options trading advisor? If not, Internet trade may be the way for you to go. You can place trades, cancel replace orders, view your account status and get real time quotes, all with the click of your mouse. Since you are handling your own account, commissions are low, ranging from $10 to $40 per transaction. Like discount trades, this isn’t recommended as the best alternative for beginners because there is little support beyond implementing positions.
  • Broker Assisted Accounts – If you have some experience in the stock market but still need the guidance of an options trading advisor, this is an excellent option. In addition a beginner who is extremely disciplined and dedicated to learning might be interested in this level of support. Options trading advisors are available to help you with information, advice, placing orders and charting. Prices are in the $50 range per transaction which falls directly between discount trades and full service brokers.
  • Full Service Recommendations – With this type of options trading advisor you will likely be on a first-name basis, since he or she will probably be assigned to your account. Such advisors will be able to help you form an investment philosophy as well as placing trades, offering investment advice and reviewing your individual trades. This is the most expensive option but the best for the beginner or the investor that doesn’t want to spend the time to research and chart potential positions. Commissions for a service such as this range upwards of $100.
  • Day Traders – Do you want to participate in the lightening quick trading of day trading? If you want to regularly trade in and out of positions on the same day? If you are committed to turning your positions every day, this is a good account for you. Commissions are reasonable and range from $10 to $25.

Conclusion
Along with the trading rules in your stock trading plan, selecting an options trading advisor and trading account will likely be your most important decisions in the stock market. Analyze your personal approach and tendencies and select your options trading advisor based on your needs.

Be sure to learn more about options as well as how to develop your options trading plan.

 

 

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Options Exchanges

A Discussion of Options Exchanges
An important part of formulating a stock trading plan is provisions for options trading as well. In the options exchange, options orders are agreements between two investors where one party agrees to deliver something in the stock market to another party within a specific time period and for a specific price. Ownership, as normally defined, does not exist because you don’t need to possess a particular stock in order to implement a position.

In the options exchange, a stock order, whether it is a “call” (an agreement to purchase) or a “put” (an agreement to sell), gives the holder the right to purchase the designated options; in addition, the holder is entitled to simply let the options order expire without investing further.

Options Exchanges
When formulating a trading plan for options, your investment philosophy will be unaffected by the options exchange and their locations. With the use of the Internet and options trading advisors, location is not much of an issue. Some of the better known options exchanges are:

  • Philadelphia Stock Exchange (Philadelphia, PA)
  • Chicago Stock Exchange (Chicago, IL)
  • American Stock Exchange (New York, NY)
  • Chicago Board Options Exchange (Chicago, IL)
  • Pacific Stock Exchange (San Francisco, CA)
  • Cincinnati Stock Exchange (Chicago, IL)
  • International Securities Exchange (New York, NY)
  • New York Board of Trade (New York, NY)
  • New York Stock Exchange (New York, NY)
  • NASDAQ Stock Market (New York, NY)
  • Boston Stock Exchange (Boston, MA)
  • Kansas City Board of Trade (Kansas City, MO)
  • Philadelphia Board of Trade (Philadelphia, PA)

Types of Options Orders
Options orders cover in a number of different scenarios, offering the investor the ability to buy or sell and setting conditions for the transactions. The following are some of the options orders that are available:

  • Buying Calls – Buying a Call in the options exchange is a bullish options order on an underlying stock value. The investor has the opportunity to speculate on the rise of the stock’s value for the term of the contract with a predetermined risk. Most investors will look to sell their contract at a profit, while others may intend to exercise their right and purchase the underlying shares.
  • Buying Puts – Buying Puts in the options exchange is a bearish, somewhat speculative options order in which the investor anticipates that a stock will decrease in price during a set period of time. The trader realizes a profit when the stock and its underlying put option decrease in price during a set amount of time.
  • Selling Puts – When you sell puts in the options exchange, you are selling someone the right to sell you the underlying asset at a fixed price, on or before the expiration date of the option order. You can use this options order when you are bullish on the market and feel that it isn’t likely to go down in the short term, you can sell puts on a quality asset that you would like to own at a discount.
  • Selling Covered Calls – Selling a covered call is an order in the options exchange where investors are willing to pay for the right to take a stock if it reaches a much higher price. It is an excellent strategy to implement while waiting for a stock to reach your identified sell point.
  • Buying Strangle – A strangle buy in the options exchange is implemented by purchasing a call option and a put option on the same asset with the same strike price and expiration date.
  • Buying Straddle – A buy straddle is implemented by purchasing a call option and a put option on the same asset with the same strike price and expiration date. In the options exchange this is a desirable move because the risk is limited to losing the premium paid but its reward is unlimited.

Improving Your Odds In The Options Exchange
Is there anything else you can do to increase your chances of success in the options exchange? Yes there is; using a trading system like Japanese Candlesticks adds a powerful charting system, especially in the options exchange. Candlesticks was invented over 300 years ago as a method for trading in the rice markets of ancient Japan. The success of the system has grown and developed and it is an amazing tool for today’s options exchange. With the charting abilities you will gain from Japanese Candlesticks you could literally have a view inside the directions of options before they even move. Added to your trading plan, Candlesticks can put you in the right company for successful trading in the options exchange.

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Options Analysis

Options Analysis – Trading the Hype For Success
If you have ever browsed the Internet looking for stock tips, the offers jump off of the page literally screaming at you. “Start trading for BIG PROFITS by turning less money in MORE MONEY!” or “93% Winners, $18k Profit” or my favorite “Find out how to make over 87% gain monthly. Up 954% since Jan 2006!”

In spite of any promises that might be made to you, investing in the stock market has not been turned into some easy-to-learn program with astounding results, especially in the options markets. Substantial profits can be made but not because of some miracle program; if such a program existed, we would all spend the $49.95 to buy it and be incredible rich. In reality, profits are usually the result of strong options analysis, successful stock trading plans and technical analysis

In theory, options analysis and options trading are easy; all you need to do is find stocks that are going up and buy calls on them. Then you find stocks that are dropping and sell puts on them. That’s pretty easy, right? Well if it’s easy the reason is that you have spent the time researching, not because of some program off the Internet. Technical analysis and charting give you the silver bullet to increase your success in the stock market and a trading system like Japanese Candlesticks is the most powerful system available for options analysis.

What is Japanese Candlesticks?
Japanese Candlestick signals were invented around 1700 as a method of analysis in the country’s rice markets. The Japanese Rice traders analyzed reoccurring signals on trading charts when trying to pinpoint the exact times to get in and get out of their positions. Analysis with these signals made the Honshu family immensely wealthy. The signals they identified are as effective today in options analysis as they were centuries ago because while they were developed for futures analysis, they are equally powerful in options analysis.

Options analysis with Candlesticks
Candlestick charting is superior to standard bar charting. Bar charts are limited to showing you a price range for a given time period; it does not show you patterns which can help with identifying trading patterns. Japanese Candlesticks provides the type of insight needed for successful options analysis. Candlestick patterns are extremely powerful for options analysis because it provides the user with the three criteria of options trading: direction, time and magnitude.

  • Direction – Most investors have difficulty in identifying the direction of a price move. Utilizing Candlestick analysis greatly increases the probabilities of at least having a price move analyzed in the proper direction. Knowing the direction of a trend with a relatively high degree of probability allows the trader to produce high profit option strategies.
  • Time – The amount of time available for a movement in price is also an important factor. The strategy for a trade will be vastly different when considering a trade that will expire in one week versus a trade that will expire in two months.
  • Magnitude – Magnitude, the third key element, indicates stock volatility. Volatility is both the friend and the foe of investors. The Candlestick signals provide the ideal search technique for finding the trades that will move in the magnitude required to make successful trades. Utilizing gaps located by the Candlestick charts provides a source of high profit potential trades. Gaps, or windows, appear during options analysis and indicate to investors when they should get in or out of a position with vigor.

Conclusion
Since an investor is able to analyze direction, time and magnitude with Japanese Candlestick charts he or she is better equipped for options analysis and for knowing when to enter or exit positions. Options analysis with Japanese Candlesticks is not a magic wand for conjuring successful trades but a valuable tool for identifying conditions in the market and finding the profitable times to enter and exit trades.

 

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Options Orders

An Overview of Options Orders
Options orders are defined simply as an agreement between two investors where one party agrees to deliver something in the stock market to another party within a specific time period and for a specific price. For options orders the standard concept of ownership does not exist because you don’t need to own a particular stock in order to implement a position. Have you purchased a position and now you are interested in short selling that option? In the stock market you would have to borrow the stock to do it; in options trading you only need to understand that there is no ownership and no problem making the transaction.

An options order or stock order, whether it is a “call” (an agreement to purchase) or a “put” (an agreement to sell), gives the holder the right to trade options; in addition, the holder is entitled to simply let the options order expire without investing further. Options orders can be low-risk ways to make money in the stock market because many times you can exit an option order that is unfavorable for only the price of the premium.

Types of Options Orders
Options orders cover in a number of different scenarios, offering the investor the ability to buy or sell and setting conditions for the transactions. The following are some of the options orders that are available:

  • Buying Calls – Buying a Call is a bullish options order on an underlying stock value. The investor has the opportunity to speculate on the rise of the stock’s value for the term of the contract with a predetermined risk. Most investors will look to sell their contract at a profit, while others may intend to exercise their right and purchase the underlying shares.
  • Buying Puts – Buying Puts is a bearish, somewhat speculative options order in which the investor anticipates that a stock will decrease in price during a set period of time. The trader realizes a profit when the stock and its underlying put option decrease in price during a set amount of time.
  • Selling Puts – When you sell puts, you are selling someone the right to sell you the underlying asset at a fixed price, on or before the expiration date of the option order. You can use this options order when you are bullish on the market and feel that it isn’t likely to go down in the short term, you can sell puts on a quality asset that you would like to own at a discount.
  • Selling Covered Calls – Selling a covered call is an options order where investors are willing to pay for the right to take a stock if it reaches a much higher price. It is an excellent strategy to implement while waiting for a stock to reach your identified sell point.
  • Put Hedge – A Put Hedge is an options order comprised of buying puts during a bearish market to protect stock shares that, while the trader is reluctant to sell, are vulnerable to a decline in the market. Successful traders utilize strategies such as Put Hedges to insulate their portfolios from loss in a bearish market. This method also has the potential of unlimited profits, while at the same time limiting the potential loss by the investor.
  • Calendar Spread – A Calendar Spread is an options order that involves selling an option with a date that is close to expiring against the purchase of another option, of the same strike price, that has a later expiration date.
  • Selling Bear Calls – Basically, this options order strategy is to buy out-of-the-money call options and sell in-the-money call options on the same stock with the same expiration date. The plan is that the in-the-money stock closes lower than its strike price at its expiration date, and then the trader realizes maximum profits from Selling Bear Calls.
  • Selling Strangle – This options order involves selling an out-of-the-money call option and an out-of-the-money put option with different strike prices on the same asset with the same expiration date.
  • Selling Straddle – Similar to Selling Strangle, this options order is a technique that involves selling a call option and a put option on the same asset with the same strike price and expiration date.
  • Buying Strangle – A strangle buy is implemented by purchasing a call option and a put option on the same asset with the same strike price and expiration date.
  • Buying Straddle – A buy straddle is implemented by purchasing a call option and a put option on the same asset with the same strike price and expiration date. This is a desirable move because the risk is limited to losing the premium paid but its reward is unlimited.

Conclusion
There are quite a few more options orders available for your use; discussing your options orders with your broker can help to identify those that are available to you. Whether you are looking to capitalize on an upward movement of a stock or make defensive profits in a bear market, options are an excellent way to make money investing in the stock market.

 

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Options Trading Plan

Options Trading Plan – Mapping Out A Successful Future
Do you know the way to San Jose? The writer of this song seemed to be a little confused about where he was going. The same problem occurs in the commodities trading when investors decide to begin options trading without an options trading plan. It takes a great map to complete a long journey; this is also true in the options market when your trading rules help you to create a successful options trading plan.

What Is An Options Trading Plan?
An options trading plan is similar to a stock trading plan; it lays out the “terms and conditions” for making options trades. By establishing your options trading plan before you enter the market, you can unemotionally identify the types of investment strategies that you will employ and the trades that you will implement. Doing this before you begin options trading will protect you from the emotions that will grab you in the heat of the moment. Why is this important? It makes no difference if your trading is going well or poorly, there is a tendency to react emotionally. Emotions are a great thing normally, but they are of little help when you are making major money decisions with your investments.

Some things you might want to include in your options trading plan are:

  • Initial Investment – This is important not only from the prospective of your options trading plan, but from a personal one as well. The good news is that options trading can be started with a very small amount of investment. While it is safer to start with the largest possible pool of risk capital, successful trading can occur with a small amount due to the limited risk nature of most options trading. For example if an investor starts out only buying calls, the potential of gains is hypothetically limitless while the possibility of loss is limited to the premium you paid for the call.
  • Risk Capital – This rule is similar to investing in the stock market; your initial investment shouldn’t only be considered the amount you are willing to invest but the amount you are able to lose. This is the reason it is called “risk capital”. Risk capital is a sum of money you can financially bear to lose jeopardizing your standard of living. Not only should you be able to lose this money, you feel comfortable investing it as well. Think of your trading account as a business investment. It’s a fact of life that many businesses fail. If you aren’t afraid of losing your money you are more likely to make sound options trading plans.
  • Step by Step Plans – Each trader needs a well-defined strategy in their options trading plan pertaining to the actual buying and selling decisions. Some people are very disciplined and able to remember the general principles of defensive investing while others need a plan for every scenario possible. It is better to define everything so that you have a quick guide if you are unsure or confused. Also you should be honest with yourself and evaluate your tendencies. This is not a character assassination; this is your chance to make a commodity trading plan that protects your investment, so be thorough and honest.
  • Stop loss plans – While options and futures trading can have very limited risk, it always has risk. It’s doubtful that you want to think about losing money but now is the time to consider it. There are techniques that you can include in your options trading plan such as selling short that you need to understand before entering the market. These techniques will become part of your stop loss strategy so you need to understand them completely.
  • Technical analysis – This is the backbone of any options trading plan. Through charting and research, an investor has the best view of which direction a stock is heading and why. Committing to a trading system like Japanese Candlesticks is invaluable to accomplishing your technical analysis due to its powerful charting principles.

Conclusion
These rules outline the things that are important in an options trading plan and everything else that you include must recognize these principles. With this options trading education, you are establishing your options trading plan so that you can be both educated and successful in options trading.

 

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Trade Options

An Overview of Trade Options
If you search the Internet for “trade options” you will be flooded with two types of responses. The first will be “use my system to trade options and you will be insanely rich”. The second thing you will notice in your search results is that trade options and futures options seem to be linked together like two star-crossed lovers from a soap opera. While the two are similar, they are definitely different animals altogether.

Differences Between Futures and Options
The main similarity between trade options and futures is that both are “derivatives”, meaning that they have no independent value. Futures and options are contracts binding two parties and the terms of those contracts make the difference between the two.
A futures contract gives its buyer the obligation to purchase the asset in the futures markets and the seller to sell it at a preset date. If the futures holder liquidates his position prior to expiration, the delivery clause is voided, obviously.

By contrast, an options contract or stock order, whether it is a call (an agreement to purchase) or a put (an agreement to sell), gives the holder the right to trade options; in addition, the holder is entitled to simply let the option expire without investing further.

Options can be low-risk ways to make money in the stock market because many times you can exit a trade option that is unfavorable for only the price of the premium.

Types of Trade Options
Trade options cover in a number of different scenarios, offering the investor the ability to buy or sell and setting conditions for the transactions. The following are samples of the trade options that are available:

  • Buying Calls – Buying a Call is a bullish position on an underlying stock value. The investor has the opportunity to speculate on the rise of the stock’s value for the term of the contract with a predetermined risk. Most investors will look to sell their contract at a profit, while others may intend to exercise their right and purchase the underlying shares.
  • Buying Puts – Buying Puts is a bearish, somewhat speculative technique in which the investor anticipates that a stock will decrease in price during a set period of time. The trader realizes a profit when the stock and its underlying put option decrease in price during a set amount of time.
  • Selling Puts – When you sell puts, you are selling someone the right to sell you the underlying asset at a fixed price, on or before the expiration date of the option. When you are bullish on the market and feel that it isn’t likely to go down in the short term, you can sell puts on a quality asset that you would like to own at a discount.
  • Selling Covered Calls – Selling a covered call means that there are investors willing to pay for the right to take a stock if it reaches a much higher price. It is an excellent strategy to implement while waiting for a stock to reach your identified sell point.
  • Put Hedge – A Put Hedge is the technique of buying puts during a bearish market to protect stock shares that, while the trader is reluctant to sell, are vulnerable to a decline in the market. Successful traders utilize strategies such as Put Hedges to insulate their portfolios from loss in a bearish market. This method also has the potential of unlimited profits, while at the same time limiting the potential loss by the investor.

Conclusion
There are quite a few more trade options available for your use; discussing your trade options with your broker can help to identify those that are available to you. Whether you are looking to capitalize on an upward movement of a stock or make defensive profits in a bear market, options are an excellent way to make money investing in the stock market.

 

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Trading in the Stock Market, Trading Options, Trading Futures, and Options on Futures, involves substantial risk of loss and is not suitable for all investors. Past Performance is not indicative of future results. CandlestickForum.com, Candlestick-Trading-Forum.com, StephenBigalow.com, and Candlestick Forum LLC do not recommend or endorse any specific trading system or method. We recommend that you research all trading systems, methods and market strategies thoroughly. Full Disclaimer here